Home > bittorrent, indie, mp3, Music, The Playlist, Uncategorized > Indie Rock Playlist Database (new site/service)

Indie Rock Playlist Database (new site/service)

Old school database

Old school database

I discovered this service/site when its creator, Javier Fernandez, e-mailed me for permission to include my playlists in his database. I of course said yes and was immediately curious about the whole thing. Well, it turns out it’s a great service. If you’re looking for a song based on title or artist or even just want to see what was on the playlists in a particular month or year, this could be a convenient way of doing it. And the potential is there for it to become even more. It’s also nice in the sense that this is another sign of these playlist things becoming more like a larger community, with associated and related services, aggregators and forums (which BIRP is the best at IMHO, great site).

Check the database out HERE and try a search.

I’d been meaning to write about this for a while but somehow set it aside and forgot to get back to it.

Currently the database uses Criznittle’s original Indie Rock Playlist, BIRP, Jimdo, The IndieRockPlaylists.com site, Indie69, last.fm and myspace, although I’m not sure how the database uses data from last.fm or myspace. Perhaps this is a future addition or feature. Hopefully the site will eventually include Samy’s, Cut The Crap, SaG’s, Shankly and PlayIndie. The database interface is simple, clean and to the point. No bells and whistles. I like that, a lot. I can just imagine how useful something like this would be if it could also get an unlimited “firehose” of data from a site like Hypem. Wondrous! Or perhaps even bypass the use of another aggregator/curator like Hypem and just seek out the direct rss feeds of particular blogs that feature artist and label submitted promotional tracks. You could have the future of free legal music search encompassing the best of both music blog curation and the playlist community. The database could be useful to artists as well, as a way to track their exposure.

The only bug I noticed was with bands that have “and” in their names, which is quite a few. If you use the word “and” , some bands won’t show up.  Eliminate the “and” part of the band name and they DO show up, with some of them using “&” instead of “and”. (*another reason why I avoid using characters like “&” in filenames) Once you have results you can sort them by artist, song title, file size, length of the track, the month of the playlist, the year and the playlist (IRP, BIRP, Jimdo, etc etc). This is a great service to both music fans and the playlist community, and I hope Javier continues to work on it in the future. Fantastic work. It’s even available en Espanol !

Image Credit:  http://www.flickr.com/photos/adesigna/3237575990/

Image and this document: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic  (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

.

.

* I have come under fire for my “weird” file naming structure in the past, but this is just another example of why I’m right and this criticism is based on a lack of understanding. (OOOH, arrogance!!)The way I name files is standard based on being the most compatible with things such as databases, alternative operating systems and file systems.  But the way I do it balances between being human-readable and machine-readable quite nicely. I certainly didn’t come up with it myself. This is why I avoid empty spaces/special characters. The rest is just logical. The dash represents a division in the file name clearly pointing out when the band name stops and the song name begins. The underscores are used because using a dash would be confusing. Duh. 😉  And seeing as how many don’t even include the name of the band in the filenames when they create mp3s lately (hrmph) , my way is at least an improvement in that regard. Having learned to use computers on a machine that was not running windows, (not linux) a filename with empty spaces within it seems alien to me and always will. Endrant.
Advertisements
  1. April 11, 2011 at 10:47 pm

    wow, impressive database. any idea how long it took to create?

    • April 13, 2011 at 3:52 am

      No I don’t, but yeah it’s very impressive and potentially very useful.

    • April 24, 2011 at 1:25 am

      Hey:
      It really took me less than two weeks to create the database using right tools, but it took me five years to obtain the playlists every month.

      See you.

  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: